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Don't get confused between Quartzite and Quartz Countertops

 

Quartz and Quartzite countertops are indeed an excellent choice. At Marble and Granite, we work hard to bring you the best in materials and help bring your projects to fruition.

Quartzite                                            

This is an amazing material. It is naturally strong, resists heat and is hard to stain. Quartzite is formed from sandstone and quartz together under a great deal of heat and pressure. The empty grains of sandstone are filled with quartz. This process makes quartzite harder than quartz. On the Mohs scale of hardness (1-10), with 10 the hardest, granite measures between 6 and 6.5; whereas quartzite measures around 7.

However, there is a chance for etching to occur on its surface. Quartzite is considered an exceptional material for use in countertops. This can be literally found all over the world, as it is a very common material formed in the crust of the earth. You will notice the more sought after material originates in Brazil and India. The difference in price for the material in either slabs or tiles will be reflected through the availability of colors and location.

Screen Shot 2013 02 08 at 10.40.10 AM resized 600

Photo by Houzz by Visbeen Associates, Inc. 

Quartz

This rock begins as the raw material for engineered stone. Added to it are resins, some binding agents and occasionally pigments, which then turns into an amazing surface for your quartz countertops. This tends to be a bit stronger than quartzite and is not likely to etch. This, too, is able to withstand high temperatures, up to about 300 degrees F.

Though there are several brands for quartz countertops, flooring or walls, the original also is the best. Caesarstone is found in Israel and has been the leader of the industry for well over fifty years. Caesarstone has perfected the surface to retain a brilliant shine or a classy matte. Always with the environment in mind, Caesarstone chooses only those suppliers who are environmentally aware and actively seeking to reduce their footprint. Caesarstone themselves have employed in their plants the best recycling techniques.

Ultra Modern Blizzard Sink

Photo by Caesarstone

There are a variety of colors ranging from a near perfect white, deep rich browns, light grays to a deep sapphire blue, allowing you a plethora of choices for the design you create. Perusing our webpage will give you a general idea. However, we recommend you visit in person, or request samples. Reading our blog for ideas in design will allow you to see trendsetting layouts and captivating compliments of materials.

Contact us today for your current or future project.

Comments

Slight error.  
The article says, "This process makes quartzite harder than quartz." 
 
I think you may have meant to say "harder than granite". 
 
Quartzite is harder than granite but not harder than quartz. Quartz and quartzite are both 7 on the Moh scale.
Posted @ Monday, July 21, 2014 4:05 PM by JR
Very confusing. First you say that Quartzite is harder than Quartz and in the next paragraph you say Quartz is stronger?
Posted @ Sunday, January 18, 2015 10:53 AM by Cindy
I was told I have a quartz countertop, but I found that it etches very easily and is often smudgy looking even after I clean it with the best, most recommended products. It etches with lemon juice. Could it really be marble?
Posted @ Friday, February 20, 2015 9:56 AM by Jane Frick
You are right, I meant harder than granite. Thanks for reading our blogs.
Posted @ Friday, February 20, 2015 10:40 AM by Gian Luca Fiori
Hi Jane, 
You should be able to look at the underside of the counter, either an island overhang or by taking a draw out/open it and look from inside the cabinet. If it is quartz it should be "stamped" the brand, batch info etc. I hope this helps! 
Posted @ Monday, February 23, 2015 8:21 AM by Maureen Duffy
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